{"content":{"id":110,"title":"Yi Jing Translation Ratio","body":"\u003cp\u003eThe Chinese tradition has interpreted the Yi Jing/I Ching in a number of different ways: as a fortune telling book, as a book on metaphysics, as a general guide for living your life. The first way is the most common in the west by a long shot.\r\n\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cbr\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e\r\nLike a lot of Chinese books before the fourth century BCE, the Yi Jing writers placed a lot of value on eloquence, preferring to lightly imply things rather than state things outright, which is a translator's nightmare. The Yi Jing in particular has the worst source-to-target word ratio I have ever seen.\r\n\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cbr\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e\r\n謙:\t\r\n六二:鳴謙,貞吉。\r\n\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e\r\nQian:\t\r\nThe second SIX, divided, shows us humility that has made itself recognised. With firm correctness there will be good fortune. - \u003ci\u003e1/3\u003c/i\u003e\r\n\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cbr\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e\r\n天在山中,大畜\r\n\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e\r\nThe trigram (representing) a mountain, and in the midst of it that (representing) heaven, form Da Xu. - \u003ci\u003e6/17\u003c/i\u003e\r\n\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cbr\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e\r\n咸,亨,利貞,取女吉。\r\n\u003c/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003e\r\nXian indicates that, (on the fulfilment of the conditions implied in it), there will be free course and success. Its advantageousness will depend on the being firm and correct, (as) in marrying a young lady. There will be good fortune. - \u003ci\u003e7/40 or 0.175 Chinese words for every English word.\u003c/i\u003e\r\n\u003c/p\u003e","publication_date":"2018-07-09T00:00:00.000Z","created_at":"2018-06-17T19:58:47.000Z","updated_at":"2018-07-06T21:48:21.000Z","user_id":1,"rating":null},"tags":"\u003ca class=\"changeable-title\" href=\"/q?tag=china\"\u003echina\u003c/a\u003e \u003ca class=\"changeable-title\" href=\"/q?tag=ancient\"\u003eancient\u003c/a\u003e \u003ca class=\"changeable-title\" href=\"/q?tag=language\"\u003elanguage\u003c/a\u003e"}

Yi Jing Translation Ratio

The Chinese tradition has interpreted the Yi Jing/I Ching in a number of different ways: as a fortune telling book, as a book on metaphysics, as a general guide for living your life. The first way is the most common in the west by a long shot.


Like a lot of Chinese books before the fourth century BCE, the Yi Jing writers placed a lot of value on eloquence, preferring to lightly imply things rather than state things outright, which is a translator's nightmare. The Yi Jing in particular has the worst source-to-target word ratio I have ever seen.


謙: 六二:鳴謙,貞吉。

Qian: The second SIX, divided, shows us humility that has made itself recognised. With firm correctness there will be good fortune. - 1/3


天在山中,大畜

The trigram (representing) a mountain, and in the midst of it that (representing) heaven, form Da Xu. - 6/17


咸,亨,利貞,取女吉。

Xian indicates that, (on the fulfilment of the conditions implied in it), there will be free course and success. Its advantageousness will depend on the being firm and correct, (as) in marrying a young lady. There will be good fortune. - 7/40 or 0.175 Chinese words for every English word.