Scorsese #5: Taxi Driver (1976)

It would be pretty easy to say this is the greatest psychological thriller of all time. The handful of movies that come close always have something a bit cartoonish to them, but what drives Taxi Driver is an unrelenting sense of disturbing realism. It's also aged well; out-there serial killers feel like freak occurrences, but unhinged, isolation-maddened, wannabe-super heroes are all over nowadays.



Coen Brothers #3: Miller's Crossing (1990)

Fun enough to watch and completely, totally forgettable. I saw it a few months ago, and all I can say is that there was an Irish guy, about five minutes of Steve Buscemi, and some crime.



Coen Brothers #2: Raising Arizona (1987)

The first Coen comedy. A 90-minute redneck joke is a bit much, but the actors play their roles with so much conviction, it's impossible not to love their characters.

Holly Hunter is always good but is never in good movies, so this is the closest we can get to seeing her with the career she should have had.



Evangeline - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


Fair was she to behold, that maiden of seventeen summers.
Black were her eyes as the berry that grows on the thorn by the wayside,
Black, yet how softly they gleamed beneath the brown shade of her tresses!
Sweet was her breath as the breath of kine that feed in the meadows.


This is the funniest thing I have ever read in my entire life. I kept trying to read on after this line, but my head was filled with the image of people putting their heads into cows' mouths, taking a deep huff, and screaming "Ahhhhhh!" with pleasure. Or images of a man and a woman in a bar giving each other flirtatious glances. The man walks up to the woman and says, "You have cow's breath."


Anyway, this is the worst poem I have ever seen in my life, but I am giving it 2/5 because of the hilarious and evocative imagery.



Man Down, 1st Christmas Special

What an amazing and beautiful cast this was.



Coen Brothers #1: Blood Simple (1984)

The Coens got off to a really good start with this one. Honestly, I think the only person whose thrillers are close to as intense as the Coen brothers' is Scorsese. Anyway, if you like scary movies and you haven't seen this, go watch it now.



MCU #2: The Incredible Hulk (2008)

In spite of supposedly hating filming this, Edward Norton delivers a pretty good performance. It's an enjoyable film, until the big final sequence, where it segues into a generic superhero climax that doesn't fit the story or the character.


Of the 20 MCU films out right now, this is the only one that seems to have been completely, totally forgotten. It's like it's vanished from the face of the universe. Not coincidentally, this is the only phase one movie to have gone with a typical action film director, instead of a weird, risky unusual choice.



Childrens Hospital - Season 3

All the things that made this show work came into some kind of mystical, sacred balance in Season 3. Even the worst episodes are brutally, unforgivingly funny.



Live And Let Die (1973)


This has my vote for worst James Bond movie. Even a campy movie like Moonraker has its charms and some good action sequences.


James Bond is completely out-of-place in a blaxploitation film. Roger Moore is bland and obnoxious; he was never the best Bond, but he's a lot more watchable in any other Bond film. Every scene is flat and tiresome and misses the mark. In the dramatic climax, the main villain gets blown up like a balloon (pictured).


In the very last scene, we find out that the moral of the story is that Voodoo is real, even though Voodoo was pretty tangential to the plot. It's like if Godfather ended with Michael turning to the camera and saying, "I guess what we've all learned in these last few months is that oranges are delicious".